Introduction Foreword Chapter 1 - In Praise Of Children's Parties Chapter 2 - So What Was Chapter 1 All About? Chapter 3 - Inviting Trouble Chapter 4 - We've Only Just Begun Chapter 5 - Beware Of Strangers Bearing Gifts Chapter 6 - Let The Games Commence Chapter 7 - That's Another Fine Mess Chapter 8 - Feeding Time At The Zoo Chapter 9 - To Be Or Not To Be Chapter 10 - Tea For 2 (or 20, or 200!) Chapter 11 - Everybody Get Down Chapter 12 - The Party's Over Appendix 1 - Parties Outside The Home Appendix 2 - Further Reading Appendix 3 - Table of Contents

The Complete Children's Party Survival Guide

By Rob Grigor

 

APPENDIX 1


Parties outside the home
or
The not-for-the-faint-hearted section

Parties In the Garden...
...are not a great idea if you want to maintain control. Large open spaces are a delight for children and you will inevitably have break-away groups of kids who will prefer to play on the swing, climbing frame etc. making it very difficult to stick to your carefully organized program.

Tea in the garden, weather permitting can be a good idea but again be careful that you do not have children getting down prematurely to go and play as this will inevitably lead to a mass exodus from the table. Additionally the presence of insects can be a problem as can the wind if it is too strong.

Parties In a Hall or Function Room...
...are a great way to avoid any mess at home but once again a large area can lead to lots of unscheduled running around. One way of dealing with this is to cordon off an area of the hall using chairs, tables etc and run all the activities there while setting the tea tables up in the main area. Alternatively look for a hall with a small side room or a central partition which can be used to close off a suitable area.

Acoustics can be bad in some halls amplifying and echoing the sound making it difficult to communicate with the children. Halls are ideal if you are having a professional to organize the party as they will usually have amplification and be used to controlling groups of children in a larger environment.

One final note if you are having a musical party and using any kind of electronic equipment, beware of the Decibel Meter. These devices are used to prevent discos and bands from playing too loudly. If the volume raises above the preset level the power to all of the hall sockets is cut for a short while. At a children’s party with the noise of excited kiddlywinks added to any music you may be playing, it is easy to overstep this mark. The novelty of having the power go off every few minutes soon wears thin. My advice would be to avoid halls with these devices. Just ask the caretaker when enquiring.

Introduction Foreword Chapter 1 - In Praise Of Children's Parties Chapter 2 - So What Was Chapter 1 All About? Chapter 3 - Inviting Trouble Chapter 4 - We've Only Just Begun Chapter 5 - Beware Of Strangers Bearing Gifts Chapter 6 - Let The Games Commence Chapter 7 - That's Another Fine Mess Chapter 8 - Feeding Time At The Zoo Chapter 9 - To Be Or Not To Be Chapter 10 - Tea For 2 (or 20, or 200!) Chapter 11 - Everybody Get Down Chapter 12 - The Party's Over Appendix 1 - Parties Outside The Home Appendix 2 - Further Reading Appendix 3 - Table of Contents

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